Joseph Prince’s Dispensational Doctrine of a strict demarcation between Old Covenant Law and New Covenant Grace is demolished by John Stott, AW Tozer & Arthur Pink & he lied twice, Part 2 – by Rev George Ong (Dated 16 July 2023)

 

For details to the following, please read the article:

 

Joseph Prince told a lie

 

that David was under a different dispensation – the law.

 

Joseph Prince told another lie

 

when he said that God’s people

 

cannot be punished or judged

 

because of and after the cross. 

 

Appendix

 

What I had written in the Appendix is good stuff.

 

Well, to check me out,

 

you would have to read the first portion of it,

 

and see if you would like to continue.

 

But because of the comprehensive amounts of materials,

 

it is strongly advised to be read in a few sittings.

 

Read whatever you can handle.

 

Then you may wish

 

to use the rest as materials for future reference.

 

This is Part 2 to the previous article.

 

If you have missed the previous article (Part 1),

 

which is a very crucial article,

 

titled,

 

Joseph Prince declares that Martin Luther, John Calvin, John Wesley, Charles Spurgeon, Arthur Pink, AW Tozer, Martyn Lloyd-Jones, John Stott, Gordon Fee, Derek Prince & DA Carson are false prophets,

 

Please click on the link below to read:

 

https://www.revgeorgeong.com/joseph-prince-declares-that-martin-luther-john-calvin-john-wesley-charles-spurgeon-arthur-pink-aw-tozer-martyn-lloyd-jones-john-stott-gordon-fee-derek-prince-da-carson-are-false-prophets/

 

Today, Joseph Prince preached again

 

in the worship services at New Creation Church

 

in a pre-recorded video.

 

Obviously, Joseph Prince is motivated by anxiety

 

– that, come what may, he must preach,

 

even though he had announced only recently

 

that he was on sabbatical.

 

It seems that he cannot get rid

 

of this ‘addiction’ to preaching,

 

that he has to keep working on his sermons,

 

even though he is on sabbatical.

 

Why can’t he leave the job of preaching to his staff,

 

so, he can enjoy his sabbatical?

 

Is it because he thinks his staff is not quite up to it?

 

Or, does he really think he is indispensable?

 

(This article was also sent to Rev Dr Ngoei Foong Nghian, General Secretary, National Council of Churches of Singapore (NCCS) office, and for the attention of the Executive Committee Members.)

 

Please click here

 

to view the entire video.

 

In a sermon, Joseph Prince said;

 

Please click here to view the 50-second video:

 

“And here is where we need to exemplify grace.

 

We are not in a place where we need to preach,

 

Well, what happened to these people in the Old Testament,

 

will happen to you as well.

 

No, they were under the law.

 

We are under grace.

 

And we are under that still that era,

 

that dispensation where Jesus says,

 

He has come to bring the acceptable year,

 

where the free favours of God profusely abound.   

 

So, friend, enjoy the free favours of God.

 

Don’t have this consciousness,

 

if I fail, what happened to David;

 

what happened to these people in the Old Testament,

 

can happen to me.

 

Friend, David was under a different dispensation.

 

God will not punish you in that way.

 

Listen carefully, there’s discipline today,

 

but there’s no punishment.

 

All punishment was finished at the cross.”

 

Joseph Prince said:

 

“Friend, David was under a different dispensation.”

 

Joseph Prince told a lie

 

that David was under a different dispensation – the law.

 

Both David and Abraham

 

were under the same ‘dispensation’

 

or Covenant of grace as we do.

 

Romans chapter 4, and particularly, verses 1-8,

 

unambiguously expressed that

 

both David and Abraham

 

were saved or justified by grace through faith

 

and not of works.

 

That God credits His righteousness

 

to both David and Abraham

 

on the basis of their faith and not works.

 

Even though David came after

 

the giving of the law through Moses at Sinai,

 

David, as all Old Covenant people,

 

was still saved by grace though faith.

 

The law at Sinai was not a separate entity

 

from God’s Covenant of grace,

 

as Joseph Prince has deceived the people.

 

It did not distort or cancel out the Covenant of grace,

 

but was part of the Covenant of grace,

 

and the law was to emphasise

 

the importance and requirement of obedience

 

which is part and parcel

 

in God’s Covenant of grace.

 

Joseph Prince said:

 

“but there’s no punishment.

 

All punishment was finished at the cross.”

 

Joseph Prince told another lie

 

when he said that God’s people

 

cannot be punished or judged

 

because of and after the cross. 

 

The prophecy of Jesus’ severe judgement on the Jews

 

in Luke 19:42-44,

 

in which hundreds of thousands of Jews

 

were massacred by the Roman soldiers,

 

came true in AD 70 under the New Covenant,

 

after the cross.

 

In other words, the punishment or judgement of God

 

can fall not only in the Old Covenant but also in the New.

 

Hence, Joseph Prince’s teaching

 

that God will not punish or judge believers

 

in the New Covenant of grace

 

by virtue of what Christ did on the cross,

 

is lie and is resoundingly demolished.

 

In another sermon, Joseph Prince said;

 

Please click here to view the 25-second video:

 

“We know what our mentality

 

become judgement mentality.

 

We looked at the world, and we started thinking,

 

‘Well, it started already.

 

God is judging the world.’

 

God is judging the world.

 

Is that true, my friend?”

 

“We cannot say God is judging America.

 

God is judging Singapore.

 

God is judging the Philippines.

 

God is judging;

 

we cannot say God is judging all this.

 

Because we are not in the day of vengeance of our God.

 

Friend, we are still under the dispensation of grace.”

 

From these 2 videos of Joseph Prince

 

and teachings from his other sermons and books,

 

Joseph Prince is passionately promoting

 

his dispensational theology

 

about the strict separation

 

between the Old Covenant Law and New Covenant Grace.

 

To Prince, the Old Covenant God

 

is one who judges, punishes and shows His anger

 

at Old Covenant people,

 

but the New Covenant God

 

can no longer judge, punish and show His anger

 

at New Covenant people,

 

because the New Covenant God

 

only shows mercy, love and grace to them.

 

Joseph Prince’s teaching is heretical

 

because it is a major distortion

 

on the character of God

 

and an infringement of His sovereignty

 

about how He can or cannot operate in both Covenants.

 

Such an erroneous teaching of Joseph Prince

 

is demolished by 3 very well-regarded teachers of the word:

 

John Stott, AW Tozer and Arthur Pink.

 

First, let’s hear from John Stott.

 

In ‘Understanding the Bible,’

 

John R. W. Stott wrote: 

 

“Does not the Old Testament portray Yahweh

 

as a fearful God of wrath and judgment,

 

who is entirely incompatible

 

with the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ?

 

How can we reconcile the thunders of Sinai

 

with the meekness and gentleness of Christ?”

 

“God’s love and wrath,

 

together with his works of salvation and of judgment,

 

are sometimes set over against each other

 

as supposedly incompatible.

 

We have already mentioned how some people imagine

 

the God of the Old Testament to be a God of anger

 

and the God of the New Testament to be a God of mercy.

 

But this is a false antithesis.

 

(George Ong’s interjection:

 

Joseph Prince is the key culprit

 

who creates this false antithesis.

 

This is why Prince keeps singing the horrid tune

 

that the Old Testament God,

 

who is angry and judges the Old Covenant people,

 

will never be angry and He will never judge

 

the New Covenant people

 

because He is the New Testament God

 

of grace, mercy and love.)

 

The Old Testament also reveals him as a God of mercy,

 

while the New Testament also reveals him as a God of judgment.

 

Indeed, the whole Bible, Old and New Testaments alike,

 

presents him as a God of love and wrath simultaneously.

 

The biblical authors are not embarrassed by this,

 

as many moderns seem to be.

 

Thus, the apostle John can tell his readers how

 

“God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son”;

 

and at the end of the same chapter

 

declare that on him who does not obey the Son

 

the wrath of God remains (John 3:16, 36).

 

Similarly, the apostle Paul can describe his readers as

 

“like the rest … by nature objects of wrath”

 

and in the very next verse

 

write that God is “rich in mercy”

 

and has loved us with a great love (Eph. 2:3-4).

 

(George Ong’s interjection:

 

Both God’s love (Jn 3:16, 36)

 

& God’s wrath (Eph 2:3-4)

 

are displayed in the New Covenant.)

 

The only explanation the Bible gives

 

of the loving and wrathful activity of God,

 

of his deeds of salvation and of judgment,

 

is simply that he is like that.

 

That is the kind of God he is,

 

and this is why he acts that way.

 

“God is love,”

 

and therefore, he loves the world and has given his Son for us (1 John 4:8-9).

 

But also “our God is a consuming fire” (Heb. 12:29; cf. Deut. 4:24).

 

His nature of perfect holiness

 

can never compromise with evil

 

but, as it were, “devours” it.

 

Always he sets himself implacably against it.”

 

“So even at Sinai God’s covenant

 

remains a covenant of grace.

 

It is important to grasp, then, that the covenant of God

 

is the same throughout, from Abraham to Christ,

 

so that those who are Christ’s by faith

 

are thereby Abraham’s children

 

and heirs of the promises God made him (Gal. 3:29).

 

The law which was given at Sinai

 

did not annul the covenant of grace.

 

On the contrary,

 

the covenant of grace

 

was confirmed and renewed at Sinai.

 

What the law did

 

was to emphasis and expand

 

the requirement of obedience.

 

(George Ong’s interjection:

 

What John Stott means is that

 

obedience, which was emphasised by the law,

 

is an integral part of grace,

 

both in the Old Covenant and the New.

 

Obedience does not earn grace or salvation,

 

but it is evidence and a fruit of grace.

 

One, who does not show obedience in his life,

 

cannot be one who has experienced the grace of God.   

 

What John Stott also teaches is that

 

the law which was given at Sinai in Exodus 19,

 

is part of the Covenant of grace,

 

and that the Covenant of grace

 

was confirmed and renewed

 

at the giving of the law at Sinai.

 

But what Joseph Prince has forbiddingly done

 

in many of his sermons on Exodus 19

 

is that he has postured the law in Exodus 19

 

as something which is separate

 

from God’s covenant of grace.

 

Instead of seeing law and grace as operating together

 

in God’s overall purpose,

 

he now pits (New Covenant) grace

 

against (Old Covenant) law.) 

 

It is only when the law

 

is considered in isolation from the covenant of grace

 

that it is contrasted with the gospel.

 

Then the law is seen

 

to condemn the sinner for his disobedience,

 

while the gospel offers him life by grace.”

 

In ‘And He Dwelt Among Us,’

 

AW Tozer wrote:

 

“The suggestion that

 

the Old Testament is a book of law

 

and the New Testament a book of grace

 

is a false premise.

 

There is as much grace and mercy and love

 

in the Old Testament

 

as there is in the New.

 

There is more about hell in the New Testament

 

than there is in the Old.

 

When it comes to judgment

 

and the fury of God burning with fire

 

upon simple men and simple creatures,

 

it is found in the New Testament,

 

not in the Old.

 

If you want excoriation, blisters and burns,

 

do not go to Jeremiah,

 

go to Jesus Christ.

 

The God of the Old Testament

 

is the God of the New,

 

and the Father of the Old Testament

 

is the Father of the New Testament.

 

The Christ who was made flesh to dwell among us

 

is the Christ who walked through all the pages of the Old Testament.

 

Was it the law that forgave David

 

when he committed his immoral sin?

 

No, it was grace.

 

Was it grace that said,

 

“Babylon has fallen, the great harlot is fallen, Babylon, is fallen”?

 

No, it was law.

 

There is perfect and absolute harmony

 

between all persons of the Godhead.

 

What he says here is the contrast between

 

all that Moses could do and all that Christ could do.

 

Moses gave the law.

 

That was all Moses could do,

 

for he was not the channel

 

through which God dispensed grace.

 

God chose His only begotten Son.

 

Here lies the contrast:

 

“the law was given by Moses,

 

but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ,”

 

means only that all that Moses could do

 

was command righteousness;

 

but Jesus Christ produces righteousness.

 

All that Moses could do was forbid us to sin;

 

but Jesus Christ came to save us from sin.

 

This is not to pit one against the other,

 

but to show one doing what the other could not do.

 

(George Ong’s interjection:

 

This is exactly what Joseph Prince does.

 

In most of his sermons and writings on John 1:17,

 

Prince uses them to pit grace (Jesus) against law (Moses),

 

in that New Covenant people

 

would have nothing to do

 

with the moral law in the Ten Commandments

 

by virtue of the fact that

 

New Covenant grace has dawned.)

 

For Moses could not save,

 

but Jesus could.

 

The Holy Ghost, in Romans 10:4-7,

 

said the law Moses gave was holy, just and good

 

and must not be spoken against.

 

But it could not save.

 

But because Jesus Christ is the eternal Son,

 

the channel through which God dispenses grace to the world,

 

grace came through Jesus Christ.

 

Grace precedes everything

 

– from the first day of creation

 

until the Virgin Mary gave birth in a Bethlehem manger.

 

For it was the grace of God in Christ

 

that saved the human race from extinction

 

when they sinned in the Garden.

 

It was the grace of God

 

in Jesus Christ yet to be born

 

that saved the eighth person

 

when the Flood covered the earth.

 

And it was the grace of God

 

in Jesus Christ yet to be born,

 

but existing in preincarnation glory,

 

that forgave David when he committed his sin;

 

that forgave Abraham when he lied;

 

that enabled Abraham

 

to pray God down to 10 righteous persons

 

when He was threatening to destroy Sodom;

 

that forgave Israel repeatedly.

 

It was the grace of God in Christ

 

yet before the Incarnation that made God say (in the Old Testament),

 

“I have risen early in the morning

 

and stretched out My hands unto you.”

 

It made him say,

 

“Like as a father pitieth his children,

 

so the LORD pitieth them that fear him” (Psa 103:13).

 

Jesus is the channel through which grace comes.”

 

In ‘Experiencing the Presence of God,’

 

AW Tozer wrote:

 

“Weed: The Old and New Testaments Contain Different Messages

 

It took me quite a little while to escape the feeling

 

that the New Testament is the book of love

 

and the Old Testament is the book of judgment.

 

But I have gone through the Old and New Testaments

 

and carefully counted the words,

 

and I find three times as much about mercy

 

in the Old Testament as there is in the New.

 

There is equally as much about grace in the Old

 

as there is in the New.

 

Back in the days of Noah,

 

Noah found grace in the eyes of the Lord.

 

As we read in the psalms,

 

“The LORD is gracious, and full of compassion; slow to anger, and of great mercy” (Ps. 145:8).

 

Grace is an Old Testament quality.

 

And judgment is a New Testament quality.

 

Read the twenty-third chapter of Matthew.

 

Read the book of Revelation, Jude, and 2 Peter

 

and see what they tell

 

of the terrible judgments of God

 

coming upon the world

 

– New Testament judgments.

 

God is a God of judgment and a God of grace.

 

Both judgment and grace are in the New Testament.

 

And both judgment and grace are in the Old Testament.

 

God is always the same, without change:

 

Father, Son and Holy Ghost.”

 

In ‘The Knowledge of the Holy,’

 

AW Tozer wrote:

 

“Mercy is an attribute of God,

 

an infinite and inexhaustible energy within the divine nature

 

which disposes God to be actively compassionate.

 

Both the Old and the New Testaments

 

proclaim the mercy of God,

 

but the Old

 

has more than four times as much to say about it

 

as the New.

 

We should banish from our minds forever

 

the common but erroneous notion

 

that justice and judgment characterize the God of Israel,

 

while mercy and grace belong to the Lord of the Church.

 

(George Ong’s interjection:

 

That’s the very fatal error that Joseph Prince is teaching.)

 

Actually, there is in principle

 

no difference between the Old Testament and the New.

 

In the New Testament Scriptures

 

there is a fuller development of redemptive truth,

 

but one God speaks in both dispensations,

 

and what He speaks agrees with what He is.

 

Wherever and whenever God appears to men,

 

He acts like Himself.

 

Whether in the Garden of Eden

 

or the Garden of Gethsemane,

 

God is merciful as well as just.”

 

In ‘An Exposition of Hebrews, Faithful Classic,’

 

Arthur W. Pink wrote:

 

“Of how much sorer punishment suppose ye,

 

shall he be thought worthy who hath trodden under foot the Son of God?” (Heb 10:29a)

 

(29 How much more severely do you think

 

someone deserves to be punished who has trampled the Son of God underfoot, who has treated as an unholy thing the blood of the covenant that sanctified them, and who has insulted the Spirit of grace? Heb 10:29 NIV)

 

“The apostle’s inspired logic here

 

is the very reverse of that which obtains

 

in the corrupt theology of present-day Christendom.

 

(George Ong’s interjection:

 

corrupt theology, which refers to dispensationalism,

 

the theology that Joseph Prince subscribes to.

 

There are some things, though,

 

that I agree with Dispensationalism – Premillennialism.

 

But others, such as the Pre-tribulation rapture,

 

is atrociously erroneous.) 

 

The popular idea in these degenerate times is that,

 

under the Gospel regime

 

God has acted, is acting, and will act

 

much more mildly with transgressors,

 

than He did under the Mosaic economy (Old Covenant).

 

The very opposite is the truth.

 

No judgment from Heaven one-half as severe as that

 

which overtook Jerusalem in A.D. 70,

 

is recorded in Scripture

 

from Exodus 19 to Malachi 4!

 

Nor is there anything in God’s dealings with Israel

 

during O.T. times

 

which can begin to compare

 

with the awful severity of His “wrath”

 

as depicted in the book of Revelation!”

 

In ‘Studies in the Scriptures, Annual Volume 1933,’

 

Arthur W. Pink wrote:

 

“Practically all professing Christians believe

 

that there is a future day of retribution,

 

when God shall reward the righteous

 

and punish the wicked,

 

but comparatively few believe

 

God now does so.

 

Yet the verse with which we have opened

 

expressly declares that,

 

“The righteous shall be recompensed

 

in the earth.”

 

It is impossible to read the Scriptures

 

with an unprejudiced mind

 

and not see this truth exhibited

 

in the history of individuals, families, and nations.

 

Cain murdered Abel

 

– a mark was set upon him by God and he cried,

 

“My punishment is greater than I can bear” (Gen 4:13).

 

Noah was a just man and walked with God

 

– he and his family were preserved from the flood.

 

Pharaoh persecuted the Hebrews

 

and is drowned at the Red Sea.

 

Saul thirsts for David’s life

 

and is slain in battle.

 

Of the Lord we must say,

 

“Verily he is a God that judgeth

 

in the earth” (Psa 58:11).

 

And now comes the “Dispensationalist”

 

with his objection:

 

“All that you have said above

 

obtained during the Old Testament dispensation,

 

but in this Christian era, it is not so.

 

We are shut up to faith.”

 

(George Ong’s interjection:

 

“We are shut up to faith,”

 

could also refer to

 

“We are in the dispensation of grace,

 

and no judgement can happen

 

during this period of New Covenant grace,”

 

as said and taught by Joseph Prince,

 

who believes in dispensationalism.)

 

How ridiculous.

 

Has God vacated His throne?

 

Is He no longer shaping human affairs?

 

Is His governmental justice no longer operative?

 

Why, the most signal example in all history

 

of God’s “recompensing” the wicked and the sinner

 

in the earth

 

has transpired in this Christian dispensation!

 

It was in A.D. 70

 

that God publicly executed judgment upon Jerusalem

 

for the Jews’ rejection and crucifixion of their Messiah,

 

and the condition of that people

 

throughout the earth ever since

 

has been a perpetual exemplification

 

of this solemn truth.”

 

In ‘Repentance What Saith the Scriptures,’

 

Arthur W. Pink wrote:

 

“Of old it was announced that should any

 

“bless himself in his heart,

 

saying, I shall have peace, though I walk in the imagination of my heart to add drunkenness to thirst [that is, one sin to another]:

 

the LORD will not spare him” (Deu 29:19-20).

 

So, on the other hand it was declared,

 

“If my people which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways;

 

then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land” (2Ch 7:14; compare 2Ch 6:26).

 

And the principles of God’s judgment have not changed!

 

The death of Christ

 

has not caused God to lower His standard

 

how unspeakably horrid and dreadful

 

that anyone should suppose that it has!

 

No, what God demanded of old,

 

He demands now.”

 

(George Ong’s interjection:

 

Joseph Prince’s argument is that

 

with the death of Christ on the cross,

 

God can no longer judge us.

 

This implies that God’s standard of conduct for His people

 

is lower in the New Covenant than the Old.

 

Nothing is further from the truth.

 

I have demolished such a conception of Joseph Prince.

 

The details are found in Section 3 under the Appendix.

 

Please read them.)   

 

Rev George Ong

 

Appendix

 

(There are 4 Sections)

 

The following represents George Ong’s view

 

– why Joseph Prince’s dispensational doctrine

 

of a strict separation

 

between Old Covenant Law and New Covenant Grace

 

is erroneous.

 

Joseph Prince’s Dispensational Doctrine of a strict demarcation between Old Covenant Law & New Covenant Grace is false

 

Section 1

 

Using the excuse of the cross,

 

Joseph Prince teaches

 

that the Old Covenant God of wrath, judgement and punishment

 

can no longer act in the same way to New Covenant believers,

 

and that the New Testament God

 

has to be loving, gracious and kind to New Covenant believers.

 

Joseph Prince further teaches that

 

God had to behave in that harsh way to Old Covenant people

 

because they were under the Old Covenant of the law.

 

And since the New Covenant people

 

are now under the Covenant of grace,

 

God can no longer act in that harsh Old Covenant way,

 

but He has to be always gracious and loving to them.

 

As my ensuing arguments will show,

 

his teaching of such a strict demarcation

 

between the Old Covenant God of law

 

and the New God of grace,

 

is plainly false.

 

There is no such demarcation

 

between the Old Covenant of law

 

and the New Covenant of grace,

 

as both law and grace

 

permeate both the Old Covenant and the New.

 

The God of the Old Testament

 

does not act differently from the God of the New

 

as Joseph Prince clearly suggests.

 

But the God of the Old Testament

 

behaves the same way

 

and is the same God of the New.

 

The God, who is angry, wrathful and judging,

 

is also at the same time loving, gracious and merciful,

 

both under the Old Covenant as well as the New.

 

These two testaments have more in common

 

than what many people think.

 

For instance, many don’t realise that in the Old Testament,

 

God is often described as one

 

who is full of mercy and compassion,

 

and not just of wrath and judgement.

 

Many are ignorant that in the Old Testament,

 

God is often portrayed as one who cares, is kind, good, forgiving,

 

bestows His favor, and possesses a great love for His people.

 

To prove my case,

 

I decided to do a thorough study of the issue

 

and start from ground zero.

 

I had gone through

 

every single verse

 

in the entire Bible in the NIV

 

that contains the following words as shown:

 

love, loving, compassion, compassionate, forgive, forgiving, forgiveness, mercy, mercies, merciful, kind, kindness, care, pardon and favor.

 

By locating every verse

 

and counting every one of them, laboriously,

 

I have arrived at the following results:

 

The Concept of the Compassion of God appears,

57 times in the Old Testament and 10 times in the New.

 

The Concept of the Favor of God appears,

57 times in the Old Testament and 14 times in the New. 

 

The Concept of the Kindness of God appears,

26 times in the Old Testament and 5 times in the New.

 

The Concept of the Forgiveness of God appears,

56 times in the Old Testament and 51 times in the New.

 

The Concept of the Mercy of God appears,

73 times in the Old Testament and 56 times in the New.

 

The Concept of the Pardon of God appears,

4 times in the Old Testament and Nil in the New.

 

The Concept of the Care of God appears,

13 times in the Old Testament and 2 times in the New.

 

The Concept of the Love of God appears,

185 times in the Old Testament and 70 times in the New.

 

(Note, the minority verses in each category that state the ‘negative’: for example, God has chosen not to show mercy, or He has decided not to be forgiving, are not included.)

 

Just by a cursory look at the results,

 

Joseph Prince’s doctrine

 

that the Old Testament is under the dispensation of law

 

– and that’s why God is wrathful and punishing;

 

and the New Testament is under the dispensation of grace

 

– and that’s why God is loving and gracious,

 

is proven to be false.

 

It just doesn’t add up.

 

If Joseph Prince’s doctrine was right,

 

there would be a lop-sided emphasis

 

of God’s compassion, favor, kindness,

 

forgiveness, mercy, care, pardon and love

 

in the New Testament over the Old.

 

Yet, the data shows the opposite

 

– that for every category,

 

there are more occurrences of such ‘positive’ attributes of God

 

in the Old Testament than the New.     

 

God’s compassion, favor, kindness, forgiveness, mercy and love

 

are ‘surprisingly’ abundantly displayed in the Old Testament.

 

The same God of grace in the Old Testament

 

is the same God of grace in the New Testament.

 

Right now, I’m going to let you have a quick survey

 

of the massive amount of verses in the Old Testament

 

that talk about God’s love, compassion, forgiveness,

 

mercy, kindness and the favor of God

 

(Just quickly browse through):

 

Exodus 15:13 NIV

13 “In your unfailing love you will lead the people you have redeemed…”

 

Exodus 20:6 NIV

6 “but showing love to a thousand generations of those who love me and keep my commandments.”

 

Exodus 34:6 NIV

6 And he passed in front of Moses, proclaiming, “The Lord, the Lord, the compassionate and gracious God, slow to anger, abounding in love and faithfulness.”

 

Exodus 34:7 NIV

7 “maintaining love to thousands, and forgiving wickedness, rebellion and sin…”

 

Leviticus 26:9 NIV

9 “‘I will look on you with favor…’”

 

Numbers 14:18 NIV

18 ‘The Lord is slow to anger, abounding in love and forgiving sin and rebellion…’

 

Numbers 14:19 NIV

19 “In accordance with your great love, forgive the sin of these people, just as you have pardoned them…”

 

Numbers 14:20 NIV

20 The Lord replied, “I have forgiven them, as you asked.”

 

Deuteronomy 4:31 NIV

31 “For the Lord your God is a merciful God; he will not abandon or destroy you…”

 

Deuteronomy 5:10 NIV

10 “but showing love to a thousand generations of those who love me and keep my commandments.”

 

Deuteronomy 7:9 NIV

9 “Know therefore that the Lord your God is God; he is the faithful God, keeping his covenant of love to a thousand generations of those who love him and keep his commandments.”

 

Deuteronomy 13:17 NIV

17 “… Then the Lord will turn from his fierce anger, will show you mercy, and will have compassion on you…”

 

Deuteronomy 33:23 NIV

23 … “Naphtali is abounding with the favor of the Lord and is full of his blessing…”

 

1 Samuel 2:26 NIV

26 “And the boy Samuel continued to grow in stature and in favor with the Lord and with people.”

 

2 Samuel 22:51 NIV

51 “He gives his king great victories; he shows unfailing kindness to his anointed, to David and his descendants forever.”

 

1 Kings 3:6 NIV

6 Solomon answered, “You have shown great kindness to your servant, my father David… You have continued this great kindness to him…

 

2 Kings 13:23 NIV

23 “But the Lord was gracious to them and had compassion and showed concern for them because of his covenant with Abraham, Isaac and Jacob…”

 

1 Chronicles 16:34 NIV

34 “Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good; his love endures forever.”

 

2 Chronicles 7:14 NIV

14 “if my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land.”

 

Ezra 3:11 NIV

11 With praise and thanksgiving they sang to the Lord: “He is good; his love toward Israel endures forever…”

 

Nehemiah 9:17 NIV

17 “… But you are a forgiving God, gracious and compassionate, slow to anger and abounding in love. Therefore you did not desert them.”

 

Nehemiah 9:27 NIV

27 “… From heaven you heard them, and in your great compassion you gave them deliverers, who rescued them from the hand of their enemies.”

 

Nehemiah 9:30 NIV

30 “For many years you were patient with them…”

 

Nehemiah 9:31 NIV

31 “But in your great mercy you did not put an end to them or abandon them, for you are a gracious and merciful God.”

 

Job 10:12 NIV

12 “You gave me life and showed me kindness, and in your providence watched over my spirit.”

 

Psalm 8:4 NIV

4 “what is mankind that you are mindful of them, human beings that you care for them?”

 

Psalm 17:7 NIV

7 “Show me the wonders of your great love, you who save by your right hand those who take refuge in you from their foes.”

 

Psalm 30:5 NIV

5 “For his anger lasts only a moment, but his favor lasts a lifetime…”

 

Psalm 34:8 NIV

8 “Taste and see that the Lord is good; blessed is the one who takes refuge in him.”

 

Psalm 36:7 NIV

7 “How priceless is your unfailing love, O God! People take refuge in the shadow of your wings.”

 

Psalm 57:10 NIV

10 “For great is your love, reaching to the heavens; your faithfulness reaches to the skies.”

 

Psalm 69:16 NIV

16 “Answer me, Lord, out of the goodness of your love; in your great mercy turn to me.”

 

Psalm 78:38 NIV

38 “Yet he was merciful; he forgave their iniquities and did not destroy them. Time after time he restrained his anger and did not stir up his full wrath.”

 

Psalm 84:11 NIV

11 “For the Lord God is a sun and shield; the Lord bestows favor and honor; no good thing does he withhold from those whose walk is blameless.”

 

Psalm 86:5 NIV

5 “You, Lord, are forgiving and good, abounding in love to all who call to you.”

 

Psalm 86:13 NIV

13 “For great is your love toward me; you have delivered me from the depths, from the realm of the dead.”

 

Psalm 86:15 NIV

15 “But you, Lord, are a compassionate and gracious God, slow to anger, abounding in love and faithfulness.”

 

Psalm 95:7 NIV

7 “he is our God and we are the people of his pasture, the flock under his care…”

 

Psalm 99:8 NIV

8 “Lord our God, you answered them; you were to Israel a forgiving God, though you punished their misdeeds.”

 

Psalm 100:5 NIV

5 “For the Lord is good and his love endures forever; his faithfulness continues through all generations.”

 

Psalm 103:2-3 NIV

2 “Praise the Lord, my soul, and forget not all his benefits – 3 who forgives all your sins and heals all your diseases.”

 

Psalm 103:8 NIV

8 “The Lord is compassionate and gracious, slow to anger, abounding in love.”

 

Psalm 103:11 NIV

11 “For as high as the heavens are above the earth, so great is his love for those who fear him.”

 

Psalm 103:17 NIV

17 “But from everlasting to everlasting the Lord’s love is with those who fear him, and his righteousness with their children’s children.”

 

Psalm 111:4 NIV

4 “He has caused his wonders to be remembered; the Lord is gracious and compassionate.”

 

Psalm 116:1 NIV

1 “I love the Lord, for he heard my voice; he heard my cry for mercy.”

 

Psalm 116:5 NIV

5 “The Lord is gracious and righteous; our God is full of compassion.”

 

Psalm 144:3 NIV

5 Lord, what are human beings that you care for them, mere mortals that you think of them?”

 

Psalm 145:9 NIV

9 “The Lord is good to all; he has compassion on all he has made.”

 

Proverbs 3:34 NIV

34 “He mocks proud mockers but shows favor to the humble and oppressed.”

 

Proverbs 28:13 NIV

13 “Whoever conceals their sins does not prosper, but the one who confesses and renounces them finds mercy.”

 

Isaiah 43:4 NIV

4 “Since you are precious and honored in my sight, and because I love you, I will give people in exchange for you, nations in exchange for your life.”

 

Isaiah 49:13 NIV

13 “… For the Lord comforts his people and will have compassion on his afflicted ones.”

 

Isaiah 55:7 NIV

7 “… Let them turn to the Lord, and he will have mercy on them, and to our God, for he will freely pardon.”

 

Isaiah 63:7 NIV

7 “I will tell of the kindnesses of the Lord, the deeds for which he is to be praised, according to all the Lord has done for us – yes, the many good things he has done for Israel, according to his compassion and many kindnesses.”

 

Isaiah 63:9 NIV

9 “In all their distress he too was distressed, and the angel of his presence saved them. In his love and mercy he redeemed them; he lifted them up and carried them all the days of old.”

 

Jeremiah 31:3 NIV

3 The Lord appeared to us in the past, saying: “I have loved you with an everlasting love; I have drawn you with unfailing kindness.”

 

Lamentations 3:22 NIV

22 “Because of the Lord’s great love we are not consumed, for his compassions never fail.”

 

Ezekiel 36:9 NIV

9 “I am concerned for you and will look on you with favor; you will be plowed and sown.”

 

Ezekiel 39:25 NIV

25 “Therefore this is what the Sovereign Lord says: I will now restore the fortunes of Jacob and will have compassion on all the people of Israel…”

 

Daniel 1:9 NIV

9 “Now God had caused the official to show favor and compassion to Daniel.”

 

Daniel 9:9 NIV

9 “The Lord our God is merciful and forgiving, even though we have rebelled against him.”

 

Joel 2:13 NIV

13 “Rend your heart and not your garments. Return to the Lord your God, for he is gracious and compassionate, slow to anger and abounding in love, and he relents from sending calamity.”

 

Jonah 3:9 NIV

9 “Who knows? God may yet relent and with compassion turn from his fierce anger so that we will not perish.”

 

Jonah 4:2 NIV

2 … I knew that you are a gracious and compassionate God, slow to anger and abounding in love, a God who relents from sending calamity.

 

Micah 7:18 NIV

18 “Who is a God like you, who pardons sin and forgives the transgression of the remnant of his inheritance? You do not stay angry forever but delight to show mercy.”

 

Nahum 1:7 NIV

7 “The Lord is good, a refuge in times of trouble. He cares for those who trust in him.”

 

Zechariah 10:6 NIV

6 “I will strengthen Judah and save the tribes of Joseph. I will restore them because I have compassion on them. They will be as though I had not rejected them…”

 

Malachi 3:17 NIV

17 … “they will be my treasured possession. I will spare them, just as a father has compassion and spares his son who serves him.”

 

With the many verses that you are perusing,

 

can you be honest and ask yourself,

 

do they appear more like passages

 

you would find in the Old or New Testament?

 

We don’t have to wait until we reach the New Testament

 

before we discover the God,

 

who is loving, gracious, merciful, kind,

 

forgiving and loves to bestow His favor on His people. 

 

Such ‘positive’ attributes of God are found in abundance

 

in the Old Testament,

 

more than they are in the New.

 

I hope, by now, you would begin

 

to see through the lies of Joseph Prince. 

 

How can Joseph Prince hold to the teaching

 

that the Old Testament God

 

was much harsher than He is of the New,

 

and the New Testament God

 

is much more loving and merciful than He was of the Old.

 

By your quick survey,

 

haven’t you rediscovered that our God

 

is a God who loves, is gracious, forgiving,

 

kind, merciful and shows His favor to His people.

 

Where?

 

In the Old or New Testament?

 

In the Old Testament!

 

The Old Testament verses you have surveyed

 

which talk about God’s love, mercy and grace, etc,

 

which are already numerous,

 

are not the only verses.

 

Please see the bulk of the verses that I’ve laboriously compiled below.

 

Do take time when you are more available to go through the following Old Testament verses which talk about

 

God’s love, mercy, grace, etc,

 

(and, these in turn, are not even exhaustive):

 

Gen 4:4; 6:8; 19:16,19; 24:27; 32:10; 39:21; 50:20; 

Ex 1:20; 11:3; 12:36; 33:12,19; Lev 4:20,26; Num 15:26;

Deut 1:25; 4:21,37; 7:8,12,13; 8:7; 9:6; 10:15,18; 23:5; 30:3; 33:3,12,16;

Ruth 2:20; 1 Sam 20:14; 2 Sam 2:5; 7:15,28; 10:12; 12:24,25; 24:14; 1 Kgs 8:23; 10:9; 2 Kgs 13:4; 

1 Chron 16:41; 17:13; 19:13; 21:13; 2 Chron 1:8; 2:11; 5:13; 6:14,41,42; 7:3,6; 9:8; 20:21; 30:9,18-20; 32:25;

Ezra 7:27-28; 9:9; Neh 1:5,11; 9:19,32; 13:22,26; Job 37:13;

 

Psa 5:7,12; 6:4,9; 13:5; 18:50; 21:7; 23:6; 25:6-8; 26:3; 28:6; 30:7; 31:7,16,21,22; 32:1,10; 33:5,18,22; 36:5,10; 37:18,28; 40:10,11; 42:8; 43:3; 44:3,26; 47:4; 48:9; 51:1; 52:8; 57:3; 55:22; 59:16; 60:5; 61:7; 62:12; 63:3; 65:9; 66:20; 68:19; 69:13; 73:1; 77:7,8; 78:68; 85:7; 86:15; 87:2; 88:11; 89:1,2,14,17,24,28,33; 90:14,17; 91:14; 92:2; 94:18; 98:3; 101:1; 102:13; 103:4,13; 106:1,4,7,45; 107:1,8,15,21,31, 108:4,6; 109:21,26; 115:1; 117:2; 118:1-4,29; 119:41,64,76,88,156; 130:4,7; 135:14; 136:1-26; 138: 2,8; 143:8,12; 145:8; 146:8; 147:11;      

 

Prov 3:12; 8:17,21,35; 11:1,27; 12:2; 13:15; 15:9; 18:22;

Isa 14:1; 38:17; 49:8,10,15; 51:3; 54:7-8,10; 55:3; 60:10; 61:2; 63:9; 66:2;

Jer 2:2; 9:24; 12:15; 15:15; 30:18; 31:2,20,34; 32:18; 33:8,11,26; 36:3; 42:12; 50:20;

Lam 3:22,32; Dan 1:9; 7:22; 9:4,17,18;

Hos 1:7; 2:19; 6:6; 11:1,4,8; 14:8; Amos 5:15; Mic 7:19,20; Zeph 2:7; 3:17; Zech 1:13,16; 10:3; Mal 1:2.

(Note: Verses about ‘The Goodness of God’ are also included.)

 

So, if one cares to read the Old Testament carefully,

 

God as the loving, gracious, merciful, kind and forgiving God

 

is also strongly portrayed in the Old Testament,

 

not just the New.

 

One must not forget that the Old Covenant God

 

is described in the scriptures in Psalm 103:8 as

 

“merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in mercy.”

 

Psalm 103:8 NKJV

8 The Lord is merciful and gracious, Slow to anger, and abounding in mercy.”

 

We must always remember that the Old Covenant God in Psalm 103:10 is one

 

who “has not dealt with us according to our sins,

 

nor punished us according to our iniquities.”

 

Psalm 103:10 NKJV
10 “He has not dealt with us according to our sins, Nor punished us according to our iniquities.”

 

Hence, one must not be deceived by Joseph Prince,

 

who falsely teaches that

 

the law, the wrath, anger and judgement of God

 

characterise the Old Testament,

 

whereas grace, love, mercy and forgiveness

 

characterise the New Testament.

 

There is no such demarcation

 

that could be supported by the scriptures.

 

Section 2

 

The idea that law belongs to the Old Testament

 

and grace belongs to the New Testament,

 

which is the pet doctrine of Joseph Prince, is plainly false.

 

Grace existed in both covenants.

 

Grace was manifested by God

 

through the law in the Old Testament,

 

and a greater grace was manifested

 

through Jesus in the New Testament, John 1:16-17.

 

Did we have grace in the Old Testament before the Lord Jesus?

 

Yes, most certainly.

 

There was an abundant display of grace under the law of Moses.

 

It is significant to note that Moses,

 

the mediator of the Old Covenant

 

through whom the law was given,

 

found grace in the sight of God in Exodus 33:12:

 

Exodus 33:12 NKJV

12 Then Moses said to the Lord, “See, You say to me, ‘Bring up this people.’ But You have not let me know whom You will send with me. Yet You have said, ‘I know you by name, and you have also found grace in My sight.’

 

There was grace even in the giving of the law.

 

And you would begin to see that there was grace

 

even though the people had committed the sin of idolatry

 

by building the golden calf when the Law was given

 

– in that God displayed His grace even in His judgement:

 

Exodus 34:5-7 NIV

5 Then the Lord came down in the cloud and stood there with him and proclaimed his name, the Lord. 6 And he passed in front of Moses, proclaiming, “The Lord, the Lord, the compassionate and gracious God, slow to anger, abounding in love and faithfulness, 7 maintaining love to thousands, and forgiving wickedness, rebellion and sin. Yet he does not leave the guilty unpunished; he punishes the children and their children for the sin of the parents to the third and fourth generation.”

 

God had at first wanted to destroy the whole nation of Israel and start anew with Moses.

 

If not for the pleading and intercession of Moses on behalf of the Israelites

 

and if not for His grace,

 

God might have destroyed them.

 

Can you see the marvellous grace of God,

 

a God who is compassionate, slow to anger and abounding in love,

 

that was displayed,

 

even in the midst of judging and punishing His people

 

at the giving of the law in Exodus 34:5-7?

 

The grace of God was shown in abundance

 

to the people under the Old Covenant.

 

Does Joseph Prince know that the word ‘grace’

 

was mentioned five times in a short passage in Exodus 33:12-17?

 

Exodus 33:12-17 NKJV

12 Then Moses said to the Lord, “See, You say to me, ‘Bring up this people.’ But You have not let me know whom You will send with me. Yet You have said, ‘I know you by name, and you have also found grace in My sight.’ 13 Now therefore, I pray, if I have found grace in Your sight, show me now Your way, that I may know You and that I may find grace in Your sight. And consider that this nation is Your people.” 14 And He said, “My Presence will go with you, and I will give you rest.” 15 Then he said to Him, “If Your Presence does not go with us, do not bring us up from here. 16 For how then will it be known that Your people and I have found grace in Your sight, except You go with us? So we shall be separate, Your people and I, from all the people who are upon the face of the earth.” 17 So the Lord said to Moses, “I will also do this thing that you have spoken; for you have found grace in My sight, and I know you by name.”

 

Is Joseph Prince aware that Exodus

 

is not in the New Testament but Old Testament?

 

Can you now see that Joseph Prince’s teaching

 

that the Old Covenant people

 

are under the Law and not under grace,

 

while the New Covenant people

 

are under grace and not under the Law,

 

is mere hogwash?

 

In Exodus 33:12-17,

 

Moses pleaded for God’s mercy to be shown to His people

 

based on His grace to him and the people.

 

Because God was gracious

 

to Moses in verse 12,13,16 and 17, and His people in verse 16,

 

God changed His mind about destroying His people

 

and promised that His presence would go with them.

 

God relented because of His grace

 

that was shown to Moses the law-giver.

 

God said to Moses,

 

“I will also do this thing that you have spoken; for you have found grace in My sight…” verse 17.

 

So instead of wiping the whole nation off the face of the earth,

 

only 3,000 out of the roughly two million people were destroyed by God.

 

Is that not due to the abounding and merciful grace of God?

 

Was there not grace under the Old Covenant?

 

Of course, there was!

 

Who says there is no grace in the Old Testament?

 

Joseph Prince has falsely taught

 

that the Old Covenant people in the Old Testament

 

were under the Covenant of law,

 

giving the impression that they have hardly experienced God’s grace.

 

But as we shall see,

 

God’s grace was substantially portrayed

 

in the Old Testament, not just the New.

 

If one cares to look, it would not be long for him to discover

 

that God’s grace fills the pages of the Old Testament:

 

It was the grace of God that preserved his people in Egypt even though they were severely ill-treated.

 

It was the grace of God that delivered His people from bondage in Egypt.

 

It was the grace of God that opened the Red Sea and saved the Israelites from the Egyptians who were pursuing to slaughter them.

 

It was the grace of God that provided manna as food for the entire nation for 40 years in the wilderness,

 

and their clothes didn’t wear out, and their feet were well taken care of,

 

despite their disobedience.

 

It was the grace of God that His people were given the law to mark them as the privileged and chosen people of God.

 

It was the grace of God to Moses (Ex 33:12,13,16,17) and His people (Ex 33:16)

 

that changed God’s mind about destroying His people and promised that His presence would go with them.

 

It was the grace of God that gave the Israelites victory over their enemies to occupy Canaan, the Promised Land.

 

It was the grace of God that judges were raised to deliver them from the attacks of their enemies, time and time again

 

when the people cried out to Him for help,

 

even though these attacks were a result of their own sins. 

 

It was the grace of God that provided a way for the Old Covenant people to commune with God through the tabernacle.

 

It was the grace of God that provided the children of Israel a way to be cleansed from their sins through the animal sacrifices.

 

“Grace is seen even in the Mosaic Law

– instead of condemning the one who sinned,

the offering of animal sacrifices

are the means of grace

to restore the transgressor to a right relationship with God.”

 

We could go on and on…

 

All that could not have happened except for the grace of God.

 

Can you see how much of the grace of God

 

was present in the Old Testament?

 

The Apostle John himself said

 

that this display of grace in the Old Testament

 

was pointing to the greater grace

 

that was incarnate in the person of Christ

 

in the New Testament in John 1:16:

 

John 1:16 NIV

16 “Out of his fullness we have all received grace in place of grace already given.”

 

So, it is crystal clear

 

that grace existed in the Old Testament before Jesus.

 

Here is the difference, though.

 

Grace existed before Jesus under the Old Covenant,

 

but the means of grace was Jesus in the New Covenant.

 

The cross was the pinnacle in the manifestation of the grace of Christ for man in the New Covenant.

 

Grace had already existed in the mind of God

 

before the foundation of the world

 

and was demonstrated through the law of Moses,

 

but the plan was manifested fully and completely through Jesus.

 

Thus, grace and law are complementary allies,

 

working together in unveiling the grand, gracious and glorious salvation

 

that God had planned out before the beginning of time.   

 

Joseph Prince, in trying to pit grace against law,

 

is undermining the scriptures

 

and working against the grand purpose of God. 

 

Section 3

 

As I’ve already mentioned in Section 1

 

– while the love of God to His people appears about 70 times in the New Testament,

 

God’s love appears about 185 times in the Old Testament

 

– more than twice that of the New.

 

This means the love of God is talked about a lot more

 

in the Old Testament than the New. 

 

Joseph Prince’s dispensational theology

 

that God is a God of love to the New Covenant believers

 

because they are under the Covenant of grace,

 

and God is a God of wrath to Old Covenant people

 

because they are under the Covenant of law,

 

is again called into question. 

 

Many believers have marvelled at the intimate love that Jesus had for John in the New Testament and vice versa.

 

John ‘proudly’ describes himself as “the disciple whom Jesus loved” in John 13:23:

 

John 13:23 NIV

23 “One of them, the disciple whom Jesus loved, was reclining next to him.”

 

Yet, they have missed the great intimacy

 

that was displayed in the Old Testament,

 

where

 

“The Lord would speak to Moses face to face,

 

as one speaks to a friend” in Exodus 33:11.

 

Exodus 33:11 NIV

11 “The Lord would speak to Moses face to face, as one speaks to a friend…”

 

Many believers have also forgotten that David,

 

who was so close to God and intimate with Him,

 

that he was called “a man after God’s own heart”

 

in 1 Samuel 13:14 and Acts 13:22,

 

lived under the Old Covenant, not the New.

 

I believe that the greatest accolade

 

that could ever be lavished on a man was Moses,

 

who knew God face to face:

 

“Since then no prophet had risen in Israel like Moses whom the Lord knew face to face.”

 

Deuteronomy 34:10 NIV

10 “Since then, no prophet has risen in Israel like Moses, whom the Lord knew face to face.”

 

If there was anyone who knew what it means to be intimate with God, it was Moses.

 

If there was anyone who knew what it means to know God face to face, it was Moses.

 

Moses spent 40 days and 40 nights on Mount Sinai alone with God.

 

There was no television or mobile to distract him. 

 

There were no people to disturb him.

 

He was all alone with God.

 

Have you ever asked the question,

 

how did Moses spend 40 days and 40 nights alone with God?

 

Have you ever meditated on the sublime truth

 

of the intimate communion that transpired

 

between Moses and God for a continuing 40 days?

 

For 40 days and 40 nights, they were together.

 

I mean, was there so much to talk to God about?

 

For some of us, just one hour in the presence of God would make us bored (not that God is boring).

 

We don’t know what to do with God.

 

After half an hour with God, we have already run out of things to say.

 

But, not Moses.

 

Moses knew how to be intimate with God.

 

He knew how to bathe in the shekinah presence of God.

 

He did it not only once. He did it twice.

 

First, it was to receive the Ten Commandments.

 

The second time was when the Israelites worshipped the Golden Calf and sinned against God.

 

And for 40 days and 40 nights, he had to intercede for the Israelites to plead with God for mercy on behalf of the people.

 

Yes, Moses was remembered as the great prophet who perform signs and wonders.

 

But most importantly,

 

Moses was remembered

 

as one who knew God, intimately, face to face.

 

The example of Moses,

 

which portrays the deep intimacy

 

between God and man in the Old Testament,

 

is somewhat a heightened version

 

of John’s intimate love for Jesus

 

in the New Testament.

 

The love relationship between David and God

 

under the Old Covenant

 

is more than comparable

 

with the love that John had for the Lord Jesus

 

under the New.

 

Just go through the Psalms,

 

and you will richly discover that King David

 

talks a lot more about the love of God for him and His people, and his love for God under the Old Covenant,

 

than what the Apostle John did about God’s love in the gospel of John and his epistles under the New Covenant.

 

It is ‘verse-upon-verse-upon-verse’ rendering of God’s love,

 

and especially in some chapters in the Book of Psalms about God’s unfailing love

 

– and I’m not exaggerating!

 

The number of verses that David takes

 

to express the unfailing love of God and his love for Him

 

is aplenty and in glorious abundance!

 

Oh, how David describes God’s love and his love for God

 

so lavishly and by the use of superlatives,

 

is what is heart-warming.

 

Psalm 23, which describes God as the shepherd

 

who loves and cares deeply for His people

 

isn’t written by a New Testament saint

 

but an Old Testament king.

 

Psalm 23, which represents

 

one of the highest expressions of God’s love and care,

 

is not in the New Testament

 

but the Old.

 

Can you see that in a certain sense,

 

God’s love is displayed more numerously and in greater intensity

 

in the Old Testament than the New.

 

So, who says the Old Testament only represents the God of wrath,

 

and the New Testament only epitomises the God of love?

 

It is a false assumption and demarcation

 

that Joseph Prince has churned out to deceive the people.

 

For one, to posture that the Old Testament God

 

is wrathful, judging and punishing,

 

while the New Testament God

 

is loving, gracious and merciful

 

is not only a gross oversimplification

 

but totally unbiblical.

 

Joseph Prince has done something far worse:

 

He preaches only a God of love, grace and mercy,

 

but he obliterates the other half

 

as he teaches that God is no longer wrathful, judging and punishing

 

to New Covenant people.

 

Joseph Prince Is teaching a different God of the Bible.

 

He is teaching a God, who isn’t revealed in the scriptures,

 

but one which he concocts out of his imagination.

 

Furthermore, the grace, patience and longsuffering of God

 

with His unfaithful people

 

were more incredibly displayed

 

in the Old Testament in the Book of Hosea

 

than any other book of the New Testament.

 

God instructed Prophet Hosea to marry a prostitute,

 

or, as some scholars said that his wife became one

 

only after Hosea married her.

 

Hosea’s wife could never stay faithful.

 

She committed adultery repeatedly and unrepentantly.

 

Any husband would have divorced her straightaway.

 

But Hosea was instructed by God to receive her back,

 

each time she became unfaithful.

 

The forgiving actions of Hosea

 

was to demonstrate the God

 

who was marvellously forgiving and patient

 

with His Old Covenant people,

 

who were repeatedly and unrepentantly unfaithful

 

by going after other gods.

 

God was gracious to them

 

as He had to patiently put up with

 

about more than a hundred years of rebellion and rejection of Him,

 

hoping they will return to Him.

 

But they were recalcitrantly unrepentant.

 

God had no choice but to use Assyria

 

to destroy the Northern kingdom of Israel.

 

For over a hundred years,

 

the longsuffering God had sent prophet after prophet

 

to warn the Southern kingdom, Judah, to repent.

 

God graciously and patiently waited for their return.

 

But when she persisted

 

in her wicked disobedience and rebellion,

 

God’s judgement had to fall.

 

He used Babylon to conquer Judah

 

and packed them off into exile.

 

It is clear from the scriptures

 

that God always has been and always will be

 

a God of grace,

 

and He always has been and always will be

 

a God of judgement.

 

God is not only a God of judgement in the Old Testament,

 

but He has also dealt graciously with them.

 

Many things that God did in the Old Testament

 

were an act of grace.

 

Hence, Joseph Prince’s portrayal

 

that God is only a God of law

 

under the dispensation or Covenant of law

 

in the Old Testament,

 

and God is only a God of grace

 

under the dispensation or Covenant of grace

 

in the New Testament,

 

is false.

 

The truth is God is portrayed as a God of grace,

 

both in the Old Testament as well as in the New.

 

Section 4

 

Joseph Prince loves to teach that the God

 

who is strict in his demands of Old Covenant people

 

is no longer the same

 

as He is extremely gracious, merciful and loving

 

to New Covenant people.

 

Don’t be deceived!

 

The strict requirements on the covenantal people of God apply

 

regardless of whether they are in the Old or the New Covenant.  

 

The truth is, the strict requirements of obedience

 

on the Old Covenant people

 

are somewhat similar to the uncompromising demands

 

that the Lord Jesus, who is God Himself

 

requires of New Covenant believers in Luke 14:25-27 and 33

 

and Revelation 2:10:

 

Luke 14:25-27,33 NIV

25 Large crowds were traveling with Jesus, and turning to them he said: 26 “If anyone comes to me and does not hate father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters – yes, even their own life such a person cannot be my disciple. 27 And whoever does not carry their cross and follow me cannot be my disciple.”

33 “In the same way, those of you who do not give up everything you have cannot be my disciples.”

 

Revelation 2:10 NIV

10 “Do not be afraid of what you are about to suffer. I tell you, the devil will put some of you in prison to test you, and you will suffer persecution for ten days. Be faithful, even to the point of death, and I will give you life as your victor’s crown.”

 

Jesus demands a 100 percent loyalty

 

from New Covenant believers

 

that transcends even our closest family and friends.

 

He calls for our total commitment and ultimate allegiance,

 

which requires our willingness

 

to lay down our lives on the altar of sacrifice. 

 

So, who says the Old Covenant God is stricter in His demands

 

than what the New Testament God requires?

 

In fact, from a certain perspective,

 

the requirements of the New Covenant

 

are even more demanding than the Old.

 

While there are many promises of wealth and prosperity

 

to Old Covenant people,

 

the New Covenant believers

 

are warned not to be covetous of wealth

 

and to expect suffering, persecution

 

and even martyrdom

 

as a typical norm of their Christian Faith.

 

Furthermore, while the Old Testament

 

has a massive 613 dos and don’ts, including the Ten Commandments,

 

many believers aren’t even aware that the New Testament has even more.

 

In the New Testament,

 

there are about 1,100 dos and don’ts,

 

nearly twice as many as the Old Testament.

 

The New Testament contains 1,100 things for us to do and not do,

 

and that’s part of being a New Testament Christian.

 

One also needs to know

 

that both law and grace are displayed

 

in both the Old and New Testament.

 

In the Old Testament,

 

God unleashed His judgement and wrath

 

against His Old Covenant people

 

during their Sinai wanderings for disobeying Him.

 

Yet, on another occasion,

 

God displayed His mercy and grace

 

when He sent Jonah to preach

 

to the wicked people of Nineveh.

 

In the New Testament,

 

God showed His mercy and grace

 

by sending His Son to die for the sins of the world.

 

Yet, in the same New Testament,

 

He warned about

 

His coming judgement and wrath

 

which was further spelled out

 

in chilling and gory details

 

in the Book of Revelation.

 

Some of the greatest displays of God’s grace and mercy

 

was not in the New Testament

 

but the Old Testament,

 

when God saved the entire city of Nineveh,

 

a city of more than 120,000 wicked people, from destruction:

 

Jonah 4:11 NIV

11 “And should I not have concern for the great city of Nineveh, in which there are more than a hundred and twenty thousand people who cannot tell their right hand from their left – and also many animals?”

 

Even Peter’s preaching on the Day of Pentecost

 

pales in comparison.

 

Peter’s preaching at Pentecost, as great as it may be,

 

brought only 3,000 people (by comparison) into the Kingdom.

 

But Jonah’s preaching

 

brought the entire city of more than 120,000 people,

 

including the king to be converted.

 

Who says the grace of God

 

is only experienced in the New Testament?

 

Who says the grace of God

 

isn’t evident in the Old Testament?

 

God is a God of grace

 

both in the Old and the New Testament.

 

In fact, His grace that was displayed

 

in the case of Nineveh in the Old Testament

 

was much more abundant and far more bountiful

 

than many instances in the New Testament.

 

While one of the greatest displays

 

of God’s grace and mercy in the case of Nineveh

 

was not in the New Testament but the Old Testament,

 

the most horrifying manifestations

 

of God’s wrath and judgement that will be poured out

 

are not in the Old Testament but the New Testament

 

in the Book of Revelation,

 

when the terrifying wrath of God

 

will be mercilessly unleashed on the world.

 

This only goes to show that

 

Joseph Prince’s strict demarcation

 

between the God in the Old Covenant of law,

 

and the God in the New Covenant of grace,

 

is false.

 

There is no such demarcation.

 

God’s character encompasses

 

both His mercy, grace and love,

 

and also His wrath, judgement and punishment.

 

Both sides of His character are displayed

 

both in the Old and the New Testament.

 

For Joseph Prince to declare

 

that though God can display His wrath and judgement

 

in the Old Testament,

 

He can no longer do the same in the New Testament

 

because of the cross,

 

is pure heresy.

 

What is worse is,

 

Joseph Prince is sacrilegiously playing God

 

– by infringing on God’s sovereignty

 

– by ‘decreeing’

 

what God can and cannot do.

 

God is sovereign in the use of His wrath and mercy

 

regardless of whether it is the Old or New Testament.

 

God has chosen to display His wrath

 

not just in the Old Testament but also the New.

 

Romans 1:18 tells us that the wrath of God

 

is being displayed (present tense) against the world,

 

and the world is now under the wrath of God:

 

Romans 1:18 NIV

“The wrath of God is being revealed from heaven against all the godlessness and wickedness of people, who suppress the truth by their wickedness.”

 

The Apostle Paul warns in Romans 1:18

 

that God’s wrath has already been poured out

 

and is still being poured out on this present world.

 

Joseph Prince has deceived the multitudes

 

that Paul is only a preacher of grace and not wrath.

 

He is plainly going against the scriptures.

 

By perusing the numerous texts in Paul’s epistles,

 

it is utterly clear that

 

Paul is not only a preacher of grace

 

but he is also a preacher of wrath: 

 

Romans 2:5,8 NIV

5 “But because of your stubbornness and your unrepentant heart, you are storing up wrath against yourself for the day of God’s wrath, when his righteous judgment will be revealed.” 8 “But for those… who reject the truth and follow evil, there will be wrath and anger.”

 

Romans 5:9 NIV

9 “Since we have now been justified by his blood, how much more shall we be saved from God’s wrath through him!”

 

Romans 9:22 NIV

22 “What if God, although choosing to show his wrath and make his power known, bore with great patience the objects of his wrath – prepared for destruction?”

 

Ephesians 2:3 NIV

3 “… gratifying the cravings of our flesh and following its desires and thoughts. Like the rest, we were by nature deserving of wrath.”

 

Ephesians 5:6 NIV

6 “Let no one deceive you with empty words, for because of such things God’s wrath comes on those who are disobedient.”

 

Colossians 3:5-6 NIV

5 “Put to death, therefore, whatever belongs to your earthly nature: sexual immorality, impurity, lust, evil desires and greed, which is idolatry. 6 Because of these, the wrath of God is coming.”

 

1 Thessalonians 1:10 NIV

10 “and to wait for his Son from heaven, whom he raised from the dead – Jesus, who rescues us from the coming wrath.”

 

1 Thessalonians 2:16 NIV

16 “… In this way they always heap up their sins to the limit. The wrath of God has come upon them at last.”

 

God Himself will unleash His greatest wrath

 

against the ungodly at the coming of His Son, Christ Jesus,

 

in the New Covenant

 

as the Book of Revelation reveals:

 

Revelation 6:16-17 NIV

16 They called to the mountains and the rocks, “Fall on us and hide us from the face of him who sits on the throne and from the wrath of the Lamb!” 17 “For the great day of their wrath has come, and who can withstand it?”

 

Revelation 11:18 NIV

18 “The nations were angry, and your wrath has come…”

 

Revelation 14:10 NIV

10 “they, too, will drink the wine of God’s fury, which has been poured full strength into the cup of his wrath. They will be tormented with burning sulfur in the presence of the holy angels and of the Lamb.

 

Revelation 15:1 NIV

1 “I saw in heaven another great and marvelous sign: seven angels with the seven last plagues – last, because with them God’s wrath is completed.”

 

Revelation 15:7 NIV

7 “Then one of the four living creatures gave to the seven angels seven golden bowls filled with the wrath of God, who lives for ever and ever.”

 

Revelation 16:1 NIV

1 Then I heard a loud voice from the temple saying to the seven angels, “Go, pour out the seven bowls of God’s wrath on the earth.”

 

Revelation 16:19 NIV

19 “The great city split into three parts, and the cities of the nations collapsed. God remembered Babylon the Great and gave her the cup filled with the wine of the fury of his wrath.”

 

Revelation 14:19 NIV

19 “The angel swung his sickle on the earth, gathered its grapes and threw them into the great winepress of God’s wrath.”

 

Revelation 19:15 NIV

15 Coming out of his mouth is a sharp sword with which to strike down the nations. “He will rule them with an iron scepter.” He treads the winepress of the fury of the wrath of God Almighty.

 

Is Revelation an Old or New Testament book?

 

Revelation is a New Testament book. 

 

And His wrath would be most fiercely and dreadfully poured out

 

at the second coming of Christ in the Book of Revelation.

 

Just as God’s love is lavishly displayed in the Old Testament,

 

God’s wrath will climax in the New in Revelation.

 

There is nothing as horrifying in the Old Testament

 

than the New Testament in Revelation,

 

that portrays this terrifying image

 

of the great winepress of God’s wrath,

 

crushing sinners mercilessly like grapes in Revelation 14:19 and 19:15.

 

“The God of love and wrath

 

is the same God

 

in the Old Testament and the New

 

– the only difference is as compared to the Old,

 

God’s grace is expressed in greater immensity

 

at the start of the New,

 

but God’s wrath is expressed in harsher proportions

 

at the close of it.” (George Ong)

 

So, Joseph Prince’s teaching

 

that while law is demonstrated in the Old Testament,

 

and grace is displayed in the New Testament

 

cannot stand the test of scriptures.

 

The truth is, both law and grace

 

are displayed both in the Old Testament and the New.

 

God does not have one ‘negative’ set of behaviour in the Old Testament

 

and another positive set of behaviour in the New Testament.

 

The Old Testament God

 

does not behave differently

 

in the New Testament.

 

He is the same God

 

in both the Old Testament as well as the New.

 

Moreover, God has revealed that He never changes:

 

“I the Lord do not change…” Malachi 3:6.

 

Malachi 3:6 NIV

“I the Lord do not change…”

 

God is unchanging in His character.

 

There might be one aspect of His attributes

 

that is revealed more in some passages or chapters or books of the Bible

 

than His other aspects.

 

But His attributes,

 

from the overall perspective of the entire scriptures,

 

remain the same,

 

whether it is in the Old or the New Testament.

 

The prophesied judgement on Jerusalem by Jesus

 

in Luke 19:42-44

 

that resulted in the hundreds of thousands of Jews

 

who were massacred by the Roman soldiers

 

took place in AD 70:

 

Luke 19:42-44 NIV

42 and said, “If you, even you, had only known on this day what would bring you peace – but now it is hidden from your eyes. 43 The days will come upon you when your enemies will build an embankment against you and encircle you and hem you in on every side. 44 They will dash you to the ground, you and the children within your walls. They will not leave one stone on another, because you did not recognize the time of God’s coming to you.”

 

Just like in the Old Testament,

 

this was a manifestation of God’s wrath.

 

And this happened after the cross.

 

The cross didn’t prevent

 

the display of God’s wrath on His people.

 

So, Joseph Prince’s theory

 

of the finished work of the cross and his ‘age of grace’,

 

didn’t prevent God from displaying His wrath

 

in the New Testament as He did in the Old Testament.

 

Joseph Prince’s teachings that after the cross,

 

God will never show His wrath and judge the world

 

and punish believers ever again,

 

is exposed to be false.

 

Finally, there is no doubt

 

that the God of the New Testament

 

is not only a God of love to New Covenant believers,

 

but He is also a God of wrath to them.

 

Why?